The Selected Adventures and Memoirs of Sherlock Homes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

The Selected Adventures and Memoirs of Sherlock Homes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Barry Forshaw

This very handsome edition of some of Conan Doyle’s most iconic stories is not only a beautiful thing presented in the classic Folio Society livery, but it makes the perfect one-stop entry point for those who might be new to the Holmes canon – and there will always be people in that position, won’t there? Conan Doyle’s imperishable creation is one of the best-known characters in world fiction, with current iterations (such as Benedict Cumberbatch’s modern-day version) still captivating admirers

Emceeing the Daggers, Joel Grey-style

Emceeing the Daggers, Joel Grey-style
Barry Forshaw

The next time that the Crime Writers’ Association asks me to be MC for the Dagger Awards dinner (if, that is, they ever do again), I may do it in the style of Joel Grey in Cabaret. I will go for a chalk white face and rouged lips, and begin the evening with a chorus of Wilkommen, Bienvenue, Welcome. For the 2018 dinner at London’s Grange hotel, however, it was just a question of checking that the moths hadn’t got to my dress suit so that if I had a picture taken (like the one accompanying this piece with Dagger winners Michael Connelly and Steve Kavanagh) I would be at least partially presentable.

To the Max: Maxim Jakubowski on New Crime for October

To the Max: Maxim Jakubowski on New Crime for October

Another slate of impressive writing, and devious plots allied with wonderful characters on both sides of the good and evil wall. Moving from 1940s Hollywood to Kyrgizstan and making detours through, literally hell, Mars, Reading in a future Britain where everyone is almost hidden behind virtual reality, a Finnish holiday resort that thinks it’s in Florida, Iceland, Southern Italy and the worldwide first class travels of bestselling authors and globetrotters like Frederick Forsyth and Peter James, we have a plethora of landscapes to please every imaginative palate. Add twisted plots in fifth gear and memorable heroes and villains and you have yourself another gourmet serving of crime and mystery.

Ian Fleming Steel Shortlisted Authors at CWA Dagger Awards on Oct 25

Ian Fleming Steel Shortlisted Authors at CWA Dagger Awards on Oct 25

Forget the Man Booker and the Costa, for readers of crime – now officially the UK’s most popular genre of fiction – the CWA Daggers (hosted by Barry Forshaw) are the book awards to really sharpen your appetite. Every autumn, 10 awards are given away at a glittering black-tie dinner at a smart hotel and authors, publishers, agents and, yes, readers gather to see who gets the accolades. This year the event will take place at the Grange City Hotel in Cooper’s Row, London on Thursday 25 October.

Paris in the Dark by Robert Olen Butler

Paris in the Dark by Robert Olen Butler
Barry Forshaw

Utilising his own considerable experience as a war veteran and journalist, the award-winning Robert Olen Butler once again shows his mastery of the historical thriller with this striking novel, set during the First World War. As Parisiennes meet death by dynamite in a campaign of bombings, the German-speaking protagonist Kit seems to be the person to discover who is behind it. But things in a Butler novel are never straightforward. Those who have read earlier novels by the author will need little hesitation to pick this one up.

Bait, Grist & Security by Mike Hodges

Bait, Grist & Security by Mike Hodges
Barry Forshaw

The protagonist of Bait is a low rent PR man, the eponymous ‘bait’ utilised by a tough detective involved in a cultish enterprise imported from America. Grist focuses on a writer (one is reminded of the novelist anti-hero of Hodges’ film Pulp) who has no compunction is about utilising real-life individuals for his novels but finds that there is a high price to be paid. The final novella, Security, features an American actor who has no faith in the film he is engaged in making and opts to stay cloistered in his upscale hotel, but the hotel itself becomes a hotbed of violence. As these synopses indicate, Hodges is uninterested in utilising well-worn tropes of the crime genre, and has come up with three startlingly original scenarios.

The Innocent Wife: Amy Lloyd talks to Crime Time

The Innocent Wife: Amy Lloyd talks to Crime Time

I received a comment from someone in response to a video I posted about The Innocent Wife. It went something like, ‘Florida, of course. It’s always Florida.’ Then there was a little eye-roll emoji. Until that moment I hadn’t even thought that people might read the synopsis of my book and think I was portraying Florida in a negative way, or that I was being exploitative of the state or its population. The book is set in Florida because, first and absolutely foremost: I love Florida. Deeply. It’s been two years since I was last there but I can still vividly recall the thickness of the air and the sounds of the insects in the bushes and the vastness of it, looking out over the landscape at all those stretches of green. It’s a place that feeds my imagination and it’s where I daydream about going back to when I have the chance.

New Crime & Thriller DVDs & Blu-rays

New Crime & Thriller DVDs & Blu-rays
Barry Forshaw

COLUMBO, Season One, Various directors/Fabulous Films Dostoevsky may have done it first with his detective Porfiry slowly wearing down a murder suspect in Crime and Punishment, but this classic American series (the creators have acknowledged the literary source) ) is how most people will be familiar with the situation. The fact that it is established (and set in stone) in the very first episode here is remarkable, given how flexible this seemingly rigid format proved over many seasons – not least as a showcase of such considerable actors as Patrick McGoohan, cast several times in the seri.es as he and Peter Falk clearly liked working together It’s the landmark series that inspired an entire genre. Now Columbo television’s greatest detective comes to Blu-ray for the first time, fully restored and in hi-definition

Agatha Christie’s Golden Age: John Goddard talks to Crime Time

Agatha Christie’s Golden Age: John Goddard talks to Crime Time

Agatha Christie’s Golden Age by new author John Goddard, with an Introduction by Dr John Curran, is a must for Poirot fans. John uses his forensic skills, acquired over 30 years as lawyer in a leading London firm, to analyse the solutions, plots and clues in the 21 Poirot novels published during the Golden Age of detective fiction. He does so in a way that is logical, informative and readable and the dustjacket looks very stylish, with some of Poirot’s most memorable clues in jigsaw pieces. Crime Time asked John what inspired him to write the book and what he found most difficult.

Håkan Nesser and Translator Sarah Death on The Root of Evil

Håkan Nesser and Translator Sarah Death on The Root of Evil

Barry Forshaw writes: Rhodesian ridgebacks are a breed of dog I always associate with leading Scandinavian crime writer Håkan Nesser, whose The Root of Evil is published this month by Mantle in a translation by the much-respected Sarah Death. I have a surreal memory of wandering the streets of town Scarborough with Nesser and his wife Elke, after an event I’d done with him (pictured), trying to find the one hotel that had agreed to accept their gargantuan dog. Walking past the closed fish and chip shops of an English seaside town with one of Sweden’s key novelists was… unusual, to say the least. I reminded him of this when asking about The Root of Evil.

Golden Prey by John Sanford

Golden Prey by John Sanford
Michael Carlson

John Sandford’s Lucas Davenport is one of the enduring action heroes of the crime genre, his books coming in somewhere between police procedurals and action thrillers, usually including elements of both. Davenport himself is on the outside pretty unassuming, but reveals more and more hidden talents in each book. This is demonstrated perfectly in a very entertaining opening sequence that has nothing to do with the rest of the story, but establishes Davenport’s skill, his investigative freedom (due to circumstances arising earlier in the series), and the demeanor that allows people to think they might take advantage.

The Syndicate: Guy Bolton talks to Crime Time

The Syndicate: Guy Bolton talks to Crime Time

In my new novel The Syndicate, retired LAPD detective Jonathan Craine is tasked by the mob to investigate the murder of Bugsy Siegel, infamous Hollywood gangster and the man who invented Las Vegas. My protagonist Jonathan Craine featured in my debut novel The Pictures and people often assume that I had him in mind for a series from the beginning. The truth is, however, that when I wrote The Pictures, I never even considered that I might be asked to write a sequel. And hadn’t planned for one either.

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