Mick Herron’s London Rules and other New Crime

Mick Herron’s London Rules and other New Crime
Ruth Morse

This is book five in the Slough House series, and like books 4, 3, 2, and 1, it is remarkably original in its own ways. One does not expect that Rosy-fingered Dawn will introduce the story as she steals through the rooms of sleepy Slough House, nor that her cousin, Dusk, will bookend the story, or that in-between times both Day and Night will carry the book’s time. This shouldn’t have fazed me, because it’s partly advice from Edith Wharton, whom I revere. In Herron’s hands, it seems to lean back towards Homer, but of course it doesn’t. It’s more like pastoral, but you have to ask yourself just what that means; it’s not as if Herron wrote cosy crime, or harked back in other ways to Golden Age fiction.

An Unquiet Ghost: Linda Stratmann talks to Crime Time

An Unquiet Ghost: Linda Stratmann talks to Crime Time
Linda Stratmann

In 1871 Brighton, Mina Scarletti, small, frail and with a twisted spine, faces the world with steely defiance. Robbed of that traditional hope of Victorian women – marriage and motherhood – she views this apparent disadvantage as an opportunity to achieve anything else she pleases. Mina writes tales of horror and hauntings, and she also exposes the crimes of fraudulent mediums who try to extort money from the vulnerable bereaved. In An Unquiet Ghost, her third adventure, she is consulted by an engaged couple, cousins, whose family is blighted by a 20 year old unsolved murder

The Widows of Malabar Hill by Sujata Massey

The Widows of Malabar Hill by Sujata Massey
Ruth Morse

This wouldn’t be a book for everybody—and that would be a shame. Massey has done a lot of research about India’s first female lawyer, Cornelia Sorabji, a Parsi called to the Bar in London, who also wrote novels of women’s experience. She has not based her heroine, the attorney Perveen Mistry, on Sorabji’s life (Perveen read Law in Oxford), but used it as the foundation of a crime novel set in 1920s Bombay, and writes her historical fiction from a contemporary angle

The Execution of Justice by Friedrich Dürrenmatt (translated by John E Woods)

The Execution of Justice by Friedrich Dürrenmatt (translated by John E Woods)
Russell James

The always interesting Pushkin Press have reissued four Dürrenmatt crime classics (in suitably grainy dramatic covers) to pique the interest of those to whom his is a familiar name and to draw in any crime fan who wants to vary their diet with an unexpected Chef’s Surprise. It’s not that Dürrenmatt always took the road less chosen, more that he carved out an entirely different and perverse path through the literary undergrowth.

New Blu-rays from Powerhouse/Indicator, Arrow, Sony, Eureka

New Blu-rays from Powerhouse/Indicator, Arrow, Sony, Eureka
Barry Forshaw

WIND RIVER, Taylor Sheridan, director/Sony Taylor Sheridan’s film has been steadily acquiring something of a reputation for its effortless command of the material – not to mention its vivid sense of place. A gripping crime thriller set in the unforgiving snow plains of Wyoming. Elizabeth Olsen stars as a rookie FBI agent tasked with solving the brutal murder of a young woman in a Native American reserve. Enlisting the help of a local hunter (Jeremy Renner) to help her navigate the freezing wilderness, the two set about trying to find a vicious killer hidden in plain sight

In Strangers’ Houses: Elizabeth Mundy talks to Crime Time

In Strangers’ Houses: Elizabeth Mundy talks to Crime Time
Elizabeth Mundy

‘Curse you Christopher Columbus,’ said Magdaléna, my great grandmother, when her boat finally approached New York. She’d mistaken the Statue of Liberty for the explorer who discovered America. After 18 days beteg as a dog in steerage she wished the country had never been found. It was 1912; the year the Titantic sank. Instead of drunken Irishmen reeling around below deck, her boat was full of miserable Hungarians who had never seen the sea before (Hungary is, of course, landlocked) and never wanted to see it again.

Savages: the wedding (The Saint-Etienne Quartet, 1) by Sabri Louatah

Savages: the wedding (The Saint-Etienne Quartet, 1) by Sabri Louatah
Ruth Morse

This is the first volume of a projected quartet, by an author whose experience includes a taste for American crime series such as The Wire. It’s hard going. I don’t think the problem here is the translation: it’s Louatah’s ambition to set his scenes by conjuring up two Algerian immigrant families first seen joining together at a ‘mixed’ wedding, but there are too many characters, not well enough delineated.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This