Wonder Valley: Ivy Pochoda talks to Crime Time

Wonder Valley: Ivy Pochoda talks to Crime Time

The first time I wound up in the Mojave Desert I was immediately struck by the various ways people managed to live off the grid, tangentially connected to society, playing by whatever rules appealed to them and then making up their own. It’s a wild and untamable landscape, a place where it is trivial to disappear. Depending on your outlook, the desert can appear both mystical and spiritual, filled with energy or power. Or perhaps it is just simply strange, remote, confusing, distracting, and possessed of a gritty beauty, a place where it is possible to be deluded into beliefs that are not your own.

BELIEVE ME by JP Delaney

BELIEVE ME by JP Delaney
Barry Forshaw in the ‘I’

In the thriller genre, psychological crime reigns supreme at present, but with an avalanche of new novels, something special is needed to rise above the throng. And that extra ingredient is unquestionably provided by JP Delaney’s Believe Me, the follow-up to his highly successful The Girl Before. The new book is actually a reworking of something previously written by the pseudonymous author, but it has no sense of being anything other than fresh material. Claire Wright is an attractive young British woman with aspirations to becoming a successful actress in the US.

The Daughter of Time & Miss Pym Disposes by Josephine Tey/Folio Society

The Daughter of Time & Miss Pym Disposes by Josephine Tey/Folio Society
Barry Forshaw

It’s comforting to say that a particular book is an author’s best – particularly when few well-read people are likely to gainsay you. So, without hesitation, let’s say that The Franchise Affair is Josephine Tey’s best book – and that in a career studded with many literary triumphs. Interestingly, this much-loved crime novel doesn’t actually contain a murder – though Tey gets away with the omission swimmingly. However, other Tey books have great distinction – such as The Daughter of Time and Miss Pym Disposes. Continuing The Folio Society’s celebrated Josephine Tey collection, beautifully bound new editions have appeared, illustrated by award-winning artist Mark Smith with bindings in the series style.

The Cold Summer by Gianrico Carofiglio (translated by Howard Curtis)

The Cold Summer by Gianrico Carofiglio (translated by Howard Curtis)
Russell James

Who better to tell you how the Mafia works than the man who in real life was an Italian prosecutor and advisor to the government’s anti-Mafia Committee? His latest tale is set during the upsurge in Mafia violence in 1992 during which two of the most prominent anti-Mafia prosecutors in Sicily and those accompanying them were murdered by the mob. Here we learn of the gang wars going on at that time in Apulia. Forget the hype. Carofiglio’s Mafia is not a supranational highly organised criminal network of unholy families but a ragbag of violent street gangs, each defending its turf and squabbling – albeit murderously – with its neighbours.

Crime at Cheltenham

Crime at Cheltenham

Barry Forshaw writes: I’ll be chairing a panel at this year’s Cheltenham Literature Festival, In Cold Blood: Scandi and Nordic Noir, with the creator of the Killing, Søren Sveistrup and Quentin Bates, who’ll be talking about their new novels. But there are a host of events for crime and thriller fans at the festival this year… the irrepressible Anthony Horowitz introduces his second James Bond book, Mark Billingham reveals how to plot the perfect crime novel, Ian Rankin shares his ‘Desert Island’ books and Sophie Hannah celebrates the Queen Of Crime, Agatha Christie

Wilbur Smith surpasses Agatha Christie in the longest running series by the same author in publishing history

Wilbur Smith surpasses Agatha Christie in the longest running series by the same author in publishing history

Novelist Wilbur Smith, whose books have sold more than 130 million copies in more than 30 languages, will publish his 17th novel in the international bestselling Courtney series on September 6th, 2018. At 54 years, the Courtney series is international publishing’s longest-running ongoing saga by a single author in the history of the industry. The 17 Courtney novels began with Smith’s first published work, When the Lion Feeds (1964). Other long running series include Rex Stout’s Nero Wolfe series which ran from 1934 to 1975 with one novel, Death Times Three, published posthumously in 1985. Ngaio Marsh’s Roderick Alleyn series ran from 1934 to 1982. With Courtney’s War, Smith will surpass the record which is currently held by Agatha Christie’s Poirot series. Christie published her first Poirot novel in 1920 and her last in 1974 (Curtain was published in 1975 while the author was still alive but it was written in 1940).

Crisis: Felix Francis’s Thirteenth ‘Dick Francis’ novel

Crisis: Felix Francis’s Thirteenth ‘Dick Francis’ novel

CRISIS is the thirteenth ‘Dick Francis’ novel by Felix Francis following on from the thirty-nine penned by his late father. Of all of those, CRISIS is the first to be written from the point of view of a first-person character that knows nothing about horse racing, indeed Harrison Foster is more than a little afraid of horses. Anyone picking this book up who similarly has no knowledge of racing will have no fear that they will be left behind and might even develop an interest in the sport as a result. Conversely, people who follow racing closely may pick up a few choice nuggets along the way.

Written in Blood returns

Written in Blood returns
Barry Forshaw

“WRITTEN IN BLOOD” featuring bestselling crime authors and their true crime influences, and “EVIDENCE OF EVIL” about the role of forensics breakthroughs, return with all new episodes. LONDON, UK – 17 August, 2018 – CBS Reality, owned by AMC Networks International – UK and CBS Studios International, today announced the return of two exclusive CBS Reality Original commissions, “Written in Blood” and “Evidence of Evil,” which will both air as part of the channel’s autumn line up.

Sarah Ward’s The Shrouded Path: What is it about the 1950s?

Sarah Ward’s The Shrouded Path: What is it about the 1950s?
Sarah Ward

My crime novels set in the Derbyshire Peaks usually have two timelines. I’m fascinated by crimes which have a long gestation, old hurts that simmer away for years, even decades, until they explode into violence. In my first three books I wrote about periods I remembered. Being a child in the 1970s, for example, in my first book In Bitter Chill where I described the party dresses we wore and the freedom of playing out on the streets until dusk. For my next two books, it was the turn of the 1980s, remembering my visits to dodgy pubs where you could get a drink aged fifteen and also the vast amount of Hammer films I watched late at night.

Wanted by Robert Crais

Wanted by Robert Crais
Michael Carlson

Devon Connor hires Elvis Cole because she’s found a Rolex and wads of cash under her teenaged son’s bed. Tyson Connor goes to a special school, has troubler socializing, is a gamer. But checking into the watch, Elvis soon discovers Tyson is part of a trio of kids robbing houses in wealthy LA neighbourhoods. Kids who aren’t too sharp about keeping their identities hidden. Which is a shame, because there are two other men after them, who want back something they’ve stolen. And these guys are not as kind nor gentle as Elvis Cole.

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